Our Time is Now: The Case for and Imperative of Afro-Asian Solidarity

Amidst an uprising of Americans against police brutality – namely white cops disproportionately terrorizing black women and men and walking free of consequences – a cop actually getting indicted and charged for the killing of an unarmed black man should have been cause for celebration for a deserved – no, necessary – victory for justice. Having been a vocal advocate against the excessive police violence towards black and brown people, it was therefore difficult to trust my initial tentative reaction: the swiftness of this latest verdict was made more unsettling considering that the cop charged is Asian American.

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Audre Lorde Quotes: Part 2 Self-Reflection

Audre Lorde’s Sister Outsider is packed with strong words and tough challenges for any of us committing to become better people. Through the process of self-examination and exploration, we uncover the biases we’ve acquired, the systems that exist to ingrain them in us, and effectively learn precisely the biases we need to unlearn. For the certified social worker or those simply intending on doing social good, let her words move you. Read through the quotes with an open heart and ears to not only listen for the intended meaning, but also listen for your interpretation of today’s application. Perhaps the two aren’t too distant.

These are my favorite Audre Lorde quotes on self-reflection from Sister Outsider.

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Audre Lorde Quotes: Part 1 Gender & Race

Words dance effortlessly in her poetry, where experiences are distilled, wounds inform knowledge, and healing seemingly winds through space and time. Audre Lorde was so many things all at once, and the revelations of her multichotomy laid important roots for our movements today. At every turn, Audre made no time for the bliss of ignorance, instead probing always for a deeper exploration of who we are as a human, community, society, and system. In honor of her people passion, and #BlkAugust, here are my favorite quotes of hers on gender and race, all of which stand no less relevant today than the day they were written. It is our challenge to imprint her words in our minds, and impact our actions for change.

All quotes from Sister Outsider, 1984.

 

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“New York is Baltimore”

In the span of 3 hours, I witnessed 9 arrests by NYPD, made some new friends in solidarity, nearly lost my voice, and oscillated between deep elation over a people united, and inexplicable anger at the irony of continued police injustice during the very march to abolish it. This was the Million March NYC in response to the Baltimore uprising and the death of Freddie Gray.


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The beginning of Million March NYC on April 29th.

Within five minutes of our march, we were stopped by police blocking the road ordering us to return. Peaceful protestors initially turned around to march back until some inevitably began to push and shove while dodging aggressive police. Forced on the sidewalks, we watched on. One policeman hoisted a loud speaker projecting robotic messages to disperse the crowds and “maintain order.” This degree of militarized policing was rare even for seasoned protesters. For a moment, it felt as though we were transplanted to an unfamiliar warring state.

In the next ten minutes, the police exerted power and control by making at least 6 unnecessary arrests of peaceful protesters who may have been unlucky to stand and chant near the cops. We chanted even louder, “Shame! Shame! Shame!” Watch the video here.

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Fragmented, protesters gathered in smaller groups and marched on with our message: New York is Baltimore, and Baltimore is New York. A marching band joined with musical accompaniment that made the heavy chants and solemn mood a bit lighter. We chanted on, “This is what community looks like! This is what love looks like!” Intermittent celebrations of our collective solidarity served as a good reminder to take a look around and appreciate the power of organizing.

In spite of police intimidation, we spilled into the streets as a form of disruption. Civil disruption and its intended inconvenience mean that we are capturing attention, even if momentarily. It is a short sliver of time for the otherwise voiceless individuals to claim a few moments to be heard: “Black lives matter!” Stopped cars waited patiently while protesters encouraged drivers to get out and join. For every annoyed, head-shaking driver idling on the road, just as many smiled in delight, enthusiastically honked their horn, and chanted along in support. We took over Broadway from Union Square to City Hall, and back to Times Square.

Photo credit: Saif Alnuweiri
A protester stood with his hands up as police charged forward.

In their most subdued state, police guarded behind us or next to us to keep watch. On several occasions, the police not only stood assembled, blocking the way, but charged towards us to get us out of the streets and onto the sidewalks. If you were the unlucky few who got caught on the street chanting, you may have been arrested. During one of the altercations, the leading “Black Lives Matter” banner was torn off its posts while an excess of nearly 9 policemen charged to arrest one man. I couldn’t take my eyes off the giant mound of cops excessively piled over a single protester faced down. Others plead with black policemen and women, urging for understanding and solidarity in place of aggression and authority. In response, most turned away with no words, exposing their conflicted positions. The more the police tried to control, the more we marched on. The now bare banner posts marched on, too.

Photo credit: Saif Alnuweiri

Dialogue: Race in America

Following my recent article in Huffington Post – Guide to Getting Uncomfortable With Race – I’m hoping we can open a space for reflection and dialogue. “The uprising we’re witnessing in our digital and physical communities should be the impetus for engaging in some real discomfort with our friends, family, neighbors, and colleagues. To truly move forward, we have to move within ourselves to have some uncomfortable conversations about race in America.”

Wherever we are in our racial exploration, we all can move a bit forward each day, whether it’s in reading an article or becoming aware of a racial bias, then having a conversation with a friend. Everyday, we can move forward, however small our steps.

Here are a few questions to consider to help deepen our exploration and dialogue around race:

  1. What racial biases did you realize you hold?
  2. How are you committing to unlearning your biases each day, week, or month?
  3. How have you empathetically engaged someone in a race conversation?
  4. This #BlackLivesMatter uprising is unique in that it doesn’t necessarily operate around a single objective, but a broad and multi-faceted problem of a racist system. Do you think we need a singular objective to move forward? If not, why?
  5. In your experience, how have you successfully combated naysayers who don’t believe in the cause, are quick to blame the victim, or complain about protest-related inconveniences?
  6. Are there good examples in other nations that we can learn from as we gather power and strength to combat a racist system?
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A Revolution Cannot Be Without Art

“This is the 21st century and we need to redefine revolution. This planet needs a people’s revolution. A humanist revolution. Revolution is not about bloodshed or about going to the mountains and fighting. We will fight if we are forced to but the fundamental goal of revolution is peace. We need a revolution of the mind.

We need a revolution of the heart. We need a revolution of the spirit. The power of the people is stronger than any weapon. A people’s revolution can’t be stopped. We need to be weapons of mass construction. Weapons of mass love. It’s not enough just to change the system. We need to change ourselves. We have got to make this world user friendly. User friendly.

Are you ready to sacrifice to end world hunger. To sacrifice to end colonialism. To end neo-colonialism. To end racism. To end sexism. Revolution means the end of exploitation. Revolution means respecting people from other cultures. Revolution is creative.

Revolution means treating your mate as a friend and an equal. Revolution is sexy. Revolution means respecting and learning from your children. Revolution is beautiful. Revolution means protecting the people. The plants. The animals. The air. The water. Revolution means saving this planet.

Revolution is love.”  –  Assata Shakur

Photo Credit: Start Now Studios featured muralist Kristy Sandoval and her story behind the Assata Shakur mural in Pacoima, Los Angeles.

Amidst Ferguson Unrest, DC Comes Alive

Washington, D.C. came alive in response to the verdict to Mike Brown’s case – the police who shot the unarmed Mike Brown dead will not be indicted. An estimated 11,000 demonstrators piled into Mt. Vernon Square on November 25 at 7pm and began the march through downtown DC in solidarity with Ferguson.


Some motorists were caught in the middle of the march on New York Ave. While stuck waiting, some drivers raised their hands up and chanted with us, “hands up, don’t shoot.” A few marchers greeted the immobile motorists and apologized for their delay.

The march even paused outside of and occupied the newly opened Walmart on H Street in a display of continued protest against Walmart’s low wages. No laws were broken, nor was anything stolen while Walmart was briefly occupied. Walmart workers and shoppers expressed solidarity by throwing their hands up.

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Marchers chanted “hands up, don’t shoot.”
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Marching through DC Chinatown.
Marchers gather at Portrait Gallery in DC
Concluding the march with a gathering on the steps of the Portrait Gallery and singing songs.

Throughout the walk, many marchers encountered familiar faces and shared hugs and stories, lamenting on what the Ferguson decision meant to them. Amidst a passionate call-and-response of “no peace, no justice!” or the popular hashtag “black lives matter!”, marchers remained courteous, peaceful, and showed nothing but love. The Asian American community represented with signs that read “Yellow Peril Loves, Supports, and Protects Black Power,” and “Asian Americans in Solidarity with Ferguson.” Some chants were repeated in Spanish – “Que queremos? Justicia. Cuando? Ahora!”

The march concluded with a gathering on the steps of the Portrait Gallery while some marchers sang. Crowds dispersed around 9:30pm, about 1.5 hours after the march began.